Travelling in Central Anatolia

Comments on lodgings in Göreme, Ürgüp, Uçhisar, Nevsehir and other towns in Cappadocia

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sam.87
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Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by sam.87 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 7:06 pm

Hello,

I was wondering whether anyone who has travelled in central Anatolia could recommend a good route to take that encompasses most of the famous sites and larger towns etc. I am trying to apply for funding to travel within turkey and need to set up an itinary list which i am having problems deciding upon. I generally plan to travel by bus and train, staring my trip from Ankara and hopefully ending up in Istanbul. Places i have considered are Konya, Nevisehir, Urgup and Gerome. I definitely have to include a visit to Catalhoyuk and the Musuem of Anatolian Civilisation in Ankara but other than that I have no particular preferences... the trip has to be archaeologically orientated but not completely defined by historic visits.

Would very much appreciate details on your own experiences and tours to help me narrow down my ideas.


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David Morgan
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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by David Morgan » Wed Feb 03, 2010 3:31 pm

A lot of the interesting historical sites are a bit off the beaten track and therefore difficult and time-consuming to get to by public transport.

For instance the Hittite capital at Hattuşa is an amazing site, but tricky to get to by bus - you'd need to get to Sungurlu and then take a dolmuş to Boğazkale. And the nearby site of Alacahöyük is even more difficult to get to.

Another interesting place historically is the Phrygian capital of Gordion and the Midas Tumulus near Polatlı, but again not easy to get to. Similarly difficult is the beautiful site of Midas Sehri near Afyon.

Even Çatalhöyük would be difficult by public transport - most people take a taxi out of Konya to see it.

Ideally a rental car would be best for all of these.

You'll be seeing pieces from these sites in the Museum of Anatolian Civilisations in Ankara, so you'll definitely be inspired to visit the actual sites as well.

Sorry to sound rather negative about the transport - but that's how it is. If you've got loads of time they can be got to by local transport but it'll be hard work.

sam.87
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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by sam.87 » Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:53 pm

Thanks for that, some great sites there to think about visiting.

It will not be impossible for me to hire a car and get around that way but I will have to limit my costs in other areas. I will be travelling alone and didnt fancy diving around places in the middle of nowhere unaccompanied but it seems like the only option.
My time will be limited in Turkey as I will be working out there also, can anyone suggest any public transport routes that run fairly regularly and stop off at touristy sites? Also can someone please enlighten me and tell what a 'dolmus' is?

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David Morgan
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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by David Morgan » Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:40 pm

I did Hattuşa and Alacahöyük as a day trip once on my motorbike out of Ankara - so that could be done by car - make sure you leave early to give yourself max time. Also Gordion (south-west out of Ankara) could be done the same way, and you could maybe take in Pessinus and Gavurkale (nice Hittite carvings) as well, as a day trip.
I'd then think about taking a bus from Ankara to Göreme for the sights there (doable by locally arranged tour or DIY by bus and dolmuş - which is a minibus, by the way).
After that it depends which way you're heading - probably Konya for Çatalhöyük.

P.S. You could probably do Çatalhöyük as a day trip by car out of Göreme and then you could also see Aşıklı Höyük near Aksaray as well (well worth seeing - beautiful setting) and Aksaray Museum too.

P.P.S All these sites (and more) are marked on the Megalithic Portal website. For Hittite stuff - Hittite Monuments is a good resource.

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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by sam.87 » Mon Feb 08, 2010 3:37 pm

How much do most of the sites around the area cost? I ashume some are free to get into and most are relatively in-expensive but do you know of any which are pricey?

I will be able to stay in Ankara for pretty much no money at all so having this as a base is a good idea. Have you stayed in any nice/welcoming/reasonablly price hotels along the routes you suggest?

You seem very knowledgable I take it youve been many times before?

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David Morgan
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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by David Morgan » Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:33 pm

I think a lot of them will be free and I hear that quite a few museums have free entry now (but I didn't really mind paying just 2TL to some of them a couple of years ago). The most expensive will probably be Hattuşa (maybe 10TL, I don't know) and the Ankara museum.

For accommodation - there are a few hotels/pension at Hattuşa, see this thread - viewtopic.php?f=23&t=4259
And there are plenty of cheap dorm rooms in Cappadocia catering for backpackers.

I've been a few times. I really enjoy Turkey for chugging around on my motorbike sightseeing and meeting the locals for directions at the village tea houses. So much history everywhere!

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Re: Travelling in Central Anatolia

Post by cbcgbg » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:34 am

Aside from the surrounding natural beauty, places like Göreme and Urgup are better avoided, since they are over exploited and not authentic. There are much nicer and more interesting places in Cappadocia to visit like Mustafapasa, Avanos or Soganle.

Ankara is just a great place to hang out and you'll feel like a Turk almost instantly since noone pays attention to you.


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