Where to eat for our 3rd wedding anniversary?

Comments and recommendations for Istanbul restaurants

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chilglish
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Where to eat for our 3rd wedding anniversary?

Post by chilglish » Wed Oct 11, 2006 1:16 am

Hi all!

There are some great recommendations in this forum and lots of information I'll be taking with me when we go to Istanbul in January, but unfortunately nobody answered the question about a Valentine's day dinner.

My wife and I (both from Chile) will be celebrating our 3rd wedding anniversary in Istanbul on January 10th, 2007.

Where should we go for a romantic meal / night out :?:


The quality of the food and service are just as important as the atmosphere and (hopefully) view.

I am open to all types of suggestions, but ask you to bear in mind that my wife is a vegetarian :shock:

I look forward to reading your advice.
With many thanks and best wishes,
Claudio Guiloff


LemonLady
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Post by LemonLady » Wed Oct 11, 2006 4:13 pm

The three restaurants I have in mind are memorable and perfect for a special occasion: first is the Kordon Fish Restaurant in Cengelkoy, lots of choices if your wife eats fish, great food, service and atmosphere, the second is Sarnic, don't confuse the restaurant with the hotel of the same name. Candles shimmering in an old Roman Cistern with good food, it is awash in romance. Third is Boncuk, great restaurant with lots of choices for vegetarians.

chilglish
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Thank you

Post by chilglish » Wed Oct 11, 2006 8:17 pm

Thank you very much Lemonlady! They all sound wonderful. :D

Do any have nice views?

How much will it cost roughly, bearing in mind that we're not big drinkers?
With many thanks and best wishes,
Claudio Guiloff

suppiluliuma
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Post by suppiluliuma » Sun Oct 15, 2006 2:02 am

As it's gonna be a very special night, I recommend you Kızkulesi.
Check it out :

http://www.kizkulesi.com.tr/en/collection/default.asp
Come whoever you are...
just come as you are

chilglish
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looks amazing!

Post by chilglish » Mon Oct 16, 2006 5:58 am

Thanks Suppiluliuma! :D
That looks amazing.
Any idea how much it will cost?
Is the transport paid for separately?
Has anybody ever eaten there?

I look forward to your reply.
With many thanks and best wishes,
Claudio Guiloff

suppiluliuma
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Re: looks amazing!

Post by suppiluliuma » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:27 pm

chilglish wrote:Thanks Suppiluliuma! :D
That looks amazing.
Any idea how much it will cost?
Is the transport paid for separately?
Has anybody ever eaten there?

I look forward to your reply.
Yeah, it's one of the best choice for a special dinner all over the world. :D I'm sure you'll like and enjoy it. I guess it may cost around 100-200 US$ for two. You must get to Kabataş pier at the European side, or Salacak at the Asian side on your own. There you can take free boat service to the Tower. Click for booking and transport information
http://www.kizkulesi.com.tr/en/collection/ulasim.asp

I hope you'll enjoy every minute; I'll be looking forward to reading your report after the event. :D

I'm here for any further information.

Cheers,
Serhat
Come whoever you are...
just come as you are

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Post by steve » Tue Oct 17, 2006 1:31 pm

I would choose Kizkalesi over Sanric. I've eaten at both and Sarnic isn't as special as I'd hoped. Had lunch at Kizkalesi and would certainly fancy eating dinner there. Have to say though that neither blew me away as far as the food goes. At the moment the very very good eateries seem to be on the Asian side around the expensive Fernabace area.

chilglish
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interesting

Post by chilglish » Tue Oct 17, 2006 9:20 pm

thanks for the tips Steve! may have to have dinner one night over on the Asian side...

I wrote to the Kiz Kulesi and here is their reply:
Dear Sir

Maide Tower only before fifteen day make reservation.Call again near history.

Yes we have vejeterian menü

Two menüs use fix menü and alacarte menü's fix menü 85 ytl Alacarte menü 90 120 ytl chanced

And correct European side Kabataş 20:30 last boat

King Regards

Maiden Tower
Ahmet Seçkin
This means, if I understand the e-mail correctly, that dinner will cost anywhere from 45 to 64 euros per person (and great! they do have a vegetarian menu!) :D
With many thanks and best wishes,
Claudio Guiloff

LemonLady
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Post by LemonLady » Wed Oct 18, 2006 12:15 am

:lol: The most romantic of the three restaurants is Sarnic which will run you about 30USD per person, it has shimmering candles and a great atmosphere. Kordon Fish Restaurant is about 50USD per person, located on the Bosphorus, view is superb, Boncuk is in a busy area full of restaurants, near the fish market, no view but very good food. Also very inexpensive.

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Post by carrie » Wed Oct 18, 2006 7:47 am

Hi all found this interesting article;

Restaurant Scene of Istanbul by NewYork Sunday Times

Istanbul: Fresh as the Morning, or Rooted in Centuries Past


By HENRY SHUKMAN
Published: October 15, 2006

NAPOLEON said that if the world were a single state then its capital would be Constantinople. Even today, amid the traffic-choked streets of modern Istanbul, among the high-rises, the steep alleys and the glowing ancient churches and mosques, you can still feel exactly what he meant.

The air is thick with centuries of civilization, hallowed by history. Above the Golden Horn, once the wealthiest stretch of water on earth, hovers Hagia Sofia, perhaps the most beautiful church on earth, built in A.D. 537 by the Byzantine emperor Justinian with a dome so broad it was not superseded for a thousand years, until St. Peter’s in Rome. Just a quarter-mile away floats its rival, the Blue Mosque, finished in 1616, after the city had fallen to the Muslim Turks. Islam and Christendom; East and West; Asia and Europe: the clichés are true, they do all meet here, and have brewed up an atmosphere unmatched on the planet.

As you’d expect in the capital of the world, there are restaurants from all over. But I didn’t come to Turkey to eat Chinese, Italian or Russian. Cognoscenti say that Turkish is the best of the eastern Mediterranean cuisines, so I sallied forth in search of the most interesting indigenous kitchens.

As a visitor to Istanbul, you’re sure to be sent to Kumkapi, a district packed with fish restaurants. In fact, it’s nothing but fish restaurants, and by night it’s busy, frantic, overwhelming — a bit like wandering into a cross between a hotel theme-night party and a 70’s disco. Bright lamps, waterfalls of fairy lights, zithers and tambourines raging up and down the little pedestrian streets, amid terrace after terrace of outdoor tables — it gives new meaning to the word garish. Vendors stroll around selling everything you might need: Cohibas, dolls, teddy bears, and I even saw one man with a giant tin sailing ship hoisted on his shoulder.

With the Bosphorus, the Sea of Marmara, the Black Sea and the Aegean all within a morning’s drive, Istanbul is a great city for fish. But more interesting than any place in Kumkapi is Tarihi Karakoy Balikcisi in the Karakoy district.

Finding the restaurant, however, just behind the fish market near the Galata Bridge, is anything but simple. Down an alley lined with hardware stalls, past 200 yards of screws, drills and hinges, all that gives it away is a wood-framed doorway and a little display window with a small sample of the day’s catch. Everything here is of the day. When they run out they close. And it’s lunch-only, consisting of two tiny upstairs rooms and an even tinier one downstairs. You can’t make a reservation, although you can reserve a particular fish if it’s in (“Hold the sole, we’re on our way”). Choices go up on a blackboard.

To read the entire article here is the web-address

http://travel2.nytimes.com/2006/10/15/t ... anbul.html


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