What's safe to eat?

What to eat and drink, what not to eat or drink, food preferences, allergies, and (why not?) recipes for Turkish cooking!

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samikenina
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Post by samikenina » Wed May 23, 2007 1:28 am

actually mrwilson makes some very valid points...
ive lived in turkey for years and have never been ill but ive seen many tourists suffering from terrible turkey trots even to the point of needing rehydration therapy....and for very young kids this is serious.
Sometimes the problem is self-inflicted..over indulging ..sometimes due to low hygiene...ive seen some terrible restaurant kitchens..and sometimes for no reason at all...we are not all fortunate to have to digestive ability of a komodo dragon.


steve
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Post by steve » Wed May 23, 2007 2:09 am

Yes, I have seen the same; but this is also true for most foreign climes - not just Turkey. That was kind of the point I was trying to make, albeit in a slightly obtuse way. I really don't see much difference between a salad in Rhodes and one in Bodrum. Neither are similar to a back street cafe in the middle east.

samikenina
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Post by samikenina » Wed May 23, 2007 12:16 pm

hi Steve..Bodrum is a world away from some of the parts of Turkey that may have all the attributes of a back street cafe in the middle east...which as you say can be said of anywhere in the world.
i have seen some places in alanya where when the lights go out the walls are alive with the sound of cockroaches..no exaggeration.. the Zabita has now stepped up its efforts to check the hygiene standards and many dodgy places have either improved or been closed down...so alanya is much safer than it was say 12 years ago.
however each province has its own standards and some are not as zealous as others...therefore you have to be careful where and what you eat.
i ran a restaurant for a few years in Alanya and had to teach some of the boys basic rules for food handling....

Al
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Post by Al » Wed May 23, 2007 6:52 pm

I love the food in Turkey, but I have to admit that last time I was there I got a big dose of campylobacter bacteria and was sick as a dog for a week. I even passed oit on the return flight home (it was a more interesting flight than normal, for everyone).

It most likely came from an un-pasteurized milk product or something that came into contact with raw chicken.

It can happen.

Tavsan
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Post by Tavsan » Tue May 29, 2007 10:49 am

Al the phrase "sick as a dog" comes to mind in your description. I remember being nursed bedside a few years ago taking in big spoons full of lemon juice mixed with Turkish coffee as a remedy for my tummy woes. I still believe the culprit for me was overindulging. :shock: I ate more baked potatoes and bread in its aftermath than I ever wanted to see again. It stuck with me a couple of days and I bounced back.

Use precaution. Usually if something is cooked thoroughly it is fine. My mother was a cook so we got schooled in being clean at home. Everything got washed and prepared with caution as a rule. The drinking water here for the most part is fine in major cities where they chlorinate the heck out of it. It reminds me of the water back in my hometown in the states. I often wondered if I could bleach my clothes in it! :lol: Sanitation is an issue in places. But contact with bacteria can happen anywhere. Recently, my mother's friend got sick in the US from a bacteria that can live on a hard surface for two years unless killed by bleach. Even hand sanitizers are harmless against it. Usually tummy problems here in Turkey have to do with underprepared food or food that has been out unrefrigerated a bit long. The same culprits as in other parts of the world. Wash your hands and watch what you eat. If it looks funky just pass it by and move on to something you feel you can eat. Buffets are universally not good ideas unless they can assure the food subject to spoiling at lower temperatures remains at a temperature above a certain point. (Thanks mom for that lesson many times over.)

Overindulging can be a culprit since there is sometimes more oil and richness in Turkish food than in other places. Rolaids, Tagamet, and Immodium are your friends. :P

Still, a little safety and precaution and most people are fine.

Al glad to hear that you recovered.

Tavsan

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Post by lorien_i » Sat Nov 10, 2007 2:47 am

I have a sensitive tummy at home (Canada), so was expecting at least a bit of trouble in Turkey. I was very pleasantly surprised to have had no problems at all: we drank all kinds of water (mostly bottled), brushd our teeth from the tap, ate fruit/veggies/salads and everything without any issue at all.

One thing we did do, though, which I think helped, was we ate quite a bit of yoghurt and yoghurt dishes (mmm... Haydari!). Yoghurt is a good way of introducing good local flora/bacteria into your system, which I think helps you with the unfriendly local flora. Besides, it's delicious!

Bill_Miyorum
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Re: What's safe to eat?

Post by Bill_Miyorum » Mon Jan 28, 2008 12:02 pm

The last time I got an upset stomach in Turkey was in the 1980s. I suspect that the culprit was the water-melon that I had just eaten (it is alleged that these are not always "fed" the cleanest of water). Some guidebooks advise the avoidance of milk-based desserts that have been standing around, unrefrigerated. I don't drink the tap water in Turkey but I disagree with the member who wrote (above) that tap water is not drunk anywhere in the world. The matter is beyond the scope of this forum, so I shall say no more.

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Re:

Post by Bill_Miyorum » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:49 pm

Rauf wrote:I bet the topicstarter is from Holland,
As I was born and raised in Holland I know that the Dutch are quite sceptical about travel to Turkey.
They tell you to take about 3 shots and also that you shouldnt eat anything, that's why the dutch bring their own food with them.
Well, I have to say that there was a Dutch tour party in the hotel the last time I stayed in Istanbul, and many of its members took dinner in a nearby restaurant; they appeared to enjoy their food (and showed no signs of ill effects when they appeared for breakfast the next morning).

davcamp
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Re: What's safe to eat?

Post by davcamp » Thu Feb 21, 2008 5:47 pm

Turkey had very safe food. It's mostly oragnic and as I have been there many times I ate everything and never had a problem. Never had vaccianations either.

Interesting how American people are suspicious about foreign cuisine safety and yet the headlines here indicate "massive beef recall" nationwide.
:-)
davcamp

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David Morgan
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Re: What's safe to eat?

Post by David Morgan » Fri Feb 22, 2008 2:06 pm

davcamp wrote:Interesting how American people are suspicious about foreign cuisine safety and yet the headlines here indicate "massive beef recall" nationwide.:-)
Perhaps they're just following their Olympic team's lead... The Times.


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