Turkish wine?

What to eat and drink, what not to eat or drink, food preferences, allergies, and (why not?) recipes for Turkish cooking!

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suiko6
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Post by suiko6 » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:09 pm

Well, what I doubt is whether there really is quality! I doubt very much whether it's worth spending €20 or so on something, as I don't think it will be anywhere near what I'd get for that in Spain or Italy, say. Will try what I can find in any case, and maybe even give my liver a rest for once. What I'd like to try is the indigenous grapes - I'm not interested in grapes like Cabernet which I can get much better and cheaper at home. Maybe the Yakut is interesting?


steve
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Post by steve » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:17 pm

You are comparing a very much emerging market with established producers. You'll certainly be disappointed. Whilst there are some specialist growers in certain areas producing great stuff you won’t be stumbling upon a Turkish Margaret River. But if you want to try some unusual grape varieties then Narince or Emir is an interesting place to start. It will be expensive though in relation to the quality you’d find elsewhere, but it will be different. I wouldn’t worry too much about your liver – a good bottle of Raki will preserve it quite nicely!

geroll
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Post by geroll » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:25 pm

Yakut is not a grape, it is a trade mark of the wineyard Kavaklidere. One of the worst red wine in Tukey. Of course with 20 euros, as a starting price,you will taste good wines from local grapes (see my previous post) but it will not be the same quality that in france, spain or italy from the same price; consider it as a sponsoring for the turkish winemakers trying to make quality despite the heavy taxes.
gerard - http://www.orangeraie-de-finike.com

suiko6
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Post by suiko6 » Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:34 pm

Thanks, that was what I was expecting. But ever the optimist... so there's really nothing of interest at a cheaper price? Can't really justify drinking it out as my gf doesn't drink. What about duty-free? Is it worth looking in Antalya airport? Presumably alcohol is cheaper there with that tax regime?

Looking forward to the food anyway.

suiko6
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Post by suiko6 » Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:19 am

Gérard - Like the bit about white liquid or coffee with the oysters :-)

So what Doluca and Kavaklidere make is crap, in your opinion? As someone obviously at least as hard to please as myself, what more expensive wines would you consider to be worth trying if I should find them in duty free?

east med wanderer
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Post by east med wanderer » Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:04 pm

I've tried most of the wines mentioned on this thread but I really can't rave about any of them. Prices were bearable five years ago but are now becoming ridiculous and most restaurants seem to push the well known brands at a premium price. I'm not prepared to pay more for the wine than the meal so I will mostly have a beer with the meal.

I'm not optimistic about the future of the wine industry in Turkey - if it hasn't come right over thousands of years then I don't think it's ever going to up there with the world's best. I can't remember ever seeing a bottle of Turkish wine in a wineshop or on a supermarket shelf in Britain.

Having said this I've had some drinkable wines in Cappadocia a few years ago but I didn't make a note of them at the time. It's probably the volcanic soil that helps.

If anyone is prepared to list recommendations of some lesser known Turkish wines then we'll definitely give them a try on our next visit.

geroll
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Post by geroll » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:50 am

suiko6 wrote:Gérard - Like the bit about white liquid or coffee with the oysters :-)

So what Doluca and Kavaklidere make is crap, in your opinion? As someone obviously at least as hard to please as myself, what more expensive wines would you consider to be worth trying if I should find them in duty free?
Doluca and Kavaklidere are making good wines- according to turkish criteria- too but Villa Doluca and Yakut are their cheapest ones. What is strange in Turkish restaurants is that their selling price depends on the supposed class of the restaurant, not on the quality of the wine. In a popular restaurant you can buy a Villa Doluca for 25/30 YTL, in an expensive restaurant you buy the same bottle for 45YTL!

At present the best wines for me are the ones of Turasan; "Seneler" in white and red, their "cabernet-sauvignon" and their "bogazkere" Okuzgozu" and "kalecik karasi". But I am far from knowing all turkish wines.
Gerard - http://www.orangeraie-de-finike.com

Jeanne
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Post by Jeanne » Sat Mar 31, 2007 6:29 pm

Hi all wine lovers!
I would like to give a little response here, as I agree on one point but not at all on the other one.
Yes Turkish wine is a bit expensive due to high tax.
But no, Turkish wine is not crap! I do see this subject coming up now and then. When I was in Holland this winter I was especially paying attention to wine in restaurants. The cheapest wine is also there like 15 euro for a 'vin du table', what we all call the crap wine. It tastes alright but nothing special. In Turkey you can see the Dikmen and Kavak like this wine, for one liter you pay about 25 lira which is normal (even if it was cheaper in the past).
This wine sells very good, because it is an easy wine that goes with all sorts of food.
And I have to agree with Gerard, he gives good information about the good wines. Of course they cost you more, that is the same in Europe.
The French, Italians and Spanish give you usually an easy tablewine in a decanter for the same price. The same I noticed yesterday as I was on Rhodes.
Another good wine comes from KARAM, gerard gives the info about the grapes.
I once brought a Doluca Antik for a Dutch friend who imports wine from Umbria as a present, he is a real 'connaisseur' he gave this wine a very good value.
And of course we can all buy our wines cheaper in the local supermarket.
Cheers for all!

jane
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Post by jane » Sat Mar 31, 2007 9:51 pm

We are not great wine drinkers but i must agree with Margaret and say that we also drink Villa Doluca and it's not that bad!!!!!!! :o

Tavsan
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Post by Tavsan » Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:00 am

I am wondering if it is still OK to bring wine back into the US from Turkey what with all the hysteria about liquids. Anyone know?

Tavsan


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