Turkish Recipes

What to eat and drink, what not to eat or drink, food preferences, allergies, and (why not?) recipes for Turkish cooking!

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SwampeastMike
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Turkish Recipes

Post by SwampeastMike » Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:45 pm

Here is a great website for Turkish recipes well adapted to U.S. kitchen with Imperial measurements and most recipes using common and inexpensive ingredients:

http://www.turkishcookbook.com

A Turkish friend (professional tour guide) spent the winter off season here in the States with us and was pleasantly surprised at the Turkish dishes I made for him, many from that website. His favorite was the ekşili köfte (sour meatballs) calling them, "As good as mom makes." He also very much liked our baby spinach and wolfed down every dish I made with it, again often from that website.

His favorite U.S. dish? My homemade chili. At first he was skeptical and asked, "Where's the rice to put it on?" After his third bowl, he was hooked and kept asking me, "When are you making chili again?" I taught him how to make it (including chili beans from scrach as he won't be able to get them canned) and we put his bags up to the weight limit with canned chili beans. Also a huge container of chili powder. A Turk taking spices from the U.S. back home? Maybe a first...

His least favorite U.S. food? Nearly all of our cheeses, calling them "oily and heavy". He didn't even care for my lasagna which nearly everyone calls, "To die for". Imported Greek feta cheese was the only cheese he at least liked, but it's so expensive he didn't get it too often ;) Also a yoghurt problem. He called plain American style yoghurt "garbage" (I agree), but I was finally able to find a brand of Greek-style yoghurt (by far the most expensive of course) that he called, "OK".

His most missed food? Eggplant. Completely out-of-season and the few times I saw it fresh it was severely overpriced and not very good looking.

His biggest food surprise? That I could actually make fairly decent bread in a number of styles.


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David Morgan
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Re: Turkish Recipes

Post by David Morgan » Mon Apr 01, 2013 11:11 pm

Good one, Mike. I've had that website bookmarked for a while now - I think I was originally looking for some type of Mercimek Çorbası (probably the spicy one).

Or maybe Yoğurtlu Patlıcan Kızartması. Mmmmm.

SwampeastMike
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Re: Turkish Recipes

Post by SwampeastMike » Tue Apr 02, 2013 12:31 am

David:

Aahh. Ezo Gelin. Yum!

Another of my friend's favorites although it came from Turkish cookbook I bought years ago and I had to adapt as following the recipe exactly resulted in cement, not soup!

2 cups red lentils
2 good sized (not giant) onions
2 T tomato paste
1 cup bulgur wheat
2 T butter
2 t red pepper (I used cayenne)
2 t fresh mint (minced)
10 cups beef broth (unless you can get mutton broth ;))
salt
1 T chili pepper (I used crushed Urfa pepper)
2 t thyme (fresh best)

Chop onions. Dilute tomato paste with some water in a small bowl. Melt butter and saute onions until soft. Add the meat broth and tomato and bring to the boil. Wash the lentils and bulgur separately and add to the boiling broth with some salt (about 1 t to begin with, about 1 T if you use home made, unsalted broth). Cook, stirring constantly until the lentils and bulgur are very tender (red lentils cook VERY quickly). Run through a food mill or use a blender. Adjust salt. Add additional broth or water if necessary.


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