turkish surnames

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markcwilliamson
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turkish surnames

Post by markcwilliamson » Fri Aug 06, 2004 6:10 pm

in the 1930s turks had to choose a surname for themselves. i am interested to find out from turks what made their ancestors of the time decide what to call themselves. in england surnames appeared in the 13th century so we've all been born with surnames, but to me choosing a surname is very important as it not only names yourself but your descendents. so please to all turks out there ask your great grandparents or grandparents what made them call themselves mr/ bey.....


Rauf
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Post by Rauf » Sat Aug 07, 2004 7:07 am

my surname is şat (SHaT) but my dad told me that it's actually a type-o
şat is a type of boat.

anyways,
my surname should have been şâd (SHaa-d) which means: Joyful.

and if you are wondering what Rauf (the way it is spoken: r-auf the way it should be spoken: ra-uf) (my first name) is:
Compassionate, forgiving person.

my mothers maiden name is aydınlısoy (ai-dihn-lih-soy) which means:
enlightened family.

turkeytom
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Surnames

Post by turkeytom » Sat Aug 07, 2004 11:01 pm

It is one of the most interesting aspects of 20th-century Turkish history.

My favorite is the prominent family who didn't think the whole business of taking a surname was necessary (though clearly it was) so they chose the name "Adivar" which means "We [already] have a name".

Tom Brosnahan

Elif

Post by Elif » Wed Aug 11, 2004 1:10 am

My surname is Kundakçı. (Kundakchi with no Turkish chars of the latin alphabet if you can not view them...)

The rifles have a part called "Kundak". I was told we are called "Kundakçı" because our grandfather's father was making "Kundak" for the rifles. (Kundakçı means someone who makes "Kundak". Not a common surname. As far as I know two families have this surname. I don't know the story behind the choice of the other family. But most probably it is a similar one..)

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Kundak = Gunstock

Post by turkeytom » Wed Aug 11, 2004 2:56 am

Kundak is a gunstock, the wooden part of a rifle; or a [cannon] gun carriage.

Tom Brosnahan

laurakristen
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Vural, Burakgazi, Kartal...

Post by laurakristen » Thu Aug 12, 2004 3:23 am

I have various Turkish friends... my closest friends being the Vural family. I never knew that bit of info about Turkish people having to choose their surnames. It now makes me wonder what Vural means. Unfortunately, I cannot ask the Vurals at the moment because... they're all in Turkey for the summer! Lucky me, I was there w/ them... but only for a month. Sadly yes, I had to leave Istanbul and my lovely friends behind. I also have a friend whose surname is Kartal, meaning "eagle". And yet 2 more close Turkish friends by the surname of Burakgazi. So, if anyone knows what Vural or Burakgazi might stand for, I'd appreciate it. I've tried looking it up, but I haven't had any success. I've figured out what everyone's first name means. I'd like to surprise them with my new knowledge 8)
Laura

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Surnames

Post by turkeytom » Thu Aug 12, 2004 4:28 am

"Vural" is difficult. It's a masculine given name. Otherwise, it could be (but probably isn't) "vur, al" which means "hit, take," but it sounds like a bump-and-grab thief!

"Burakgazi" is probably a name from a renowned ancestor, "Burak the Gazi" ("warrior for the faith"). "Burak," besides meaning "borax," is the name of the Prophet Muhammed's horse that he rode when he ascended to heaven.

Tom Brosnahan

markcwilliamson
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Post by markcwilliamson » Thu Aug 12, 2004 11:34 am

i am also interested in why they chose that name and not another

Zeynep

Turkish Surnames

Post by Zeynep » Thu Aug 12, 2004 7:29 pm

Because the requirement to take a new surname was something unfamiliar to most Turks at the time, and probably because there was not much understanding of the reasons behind it, I suspect that most Turks did not give much thought to the taking of a surname, at the time. I have read or heard that our forefathers decided surnames rather casually - just because they had to do it quickly. Often, people took on the name of their professions - so if they were a blacksmith or craftsman of the time, they took the name of that profession. Another approach was to take on the name of your village. And then there is the "oglu"s, which means "son of". Those are some typical categories for Turkish surnames.

Mary
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Re: Turkish Surnames

Post by Mary » Fri Aug 13, 2004 3:03 pm

Aziz Nesin wrote: "In 1933 when the surname law was passed which directed every Turk to select a last name, people's secret feelings of inferiority surfaced: Some of the world's stingiest became known as "Eliachik" (Openhanded), the greatest cowards named themselves "Yurekli" (Stoutheart), and many of the laziest took the name ''Chalishkan" (Industrious ) . One of our teachers chose the surname of "Cheviker" (Dextrous) when he could barely sign his name to a letter. The rampant racism present caused people with mixed blood to grab for surnames which signified they were Turks.
Invariably I came last in any kind of scramble; I was no different in this one for nice surnames. No surname remained that I could take pride in, so I assumed the name of "Nesin" (What-are-you?). I wanted to think of what I was and pull myself together whenever anyone called "What-are-you?"


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