Rosetta Stone for Turkish

All about the Turkish language: learning aids, reviews and comments on courses, books, teachers--anything having to do with this wonderful language.

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SwampeastMike
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Rosetta Stone for Turkish

Post by SwampeastMike » Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:01 am

My very long time in Istanbul while learning Turkish and teaching English has been delayed for at least a year, so I decided to try Rosetta Stone before my tour this fall in the SE of Turkey.

While I knew quite a few words in Turkish (thanks in part to Tom's "100 most useful words" as well as three trips to Turkey"), I could not speak Turkish nor understand any complete conversation.

Rosetta Stone does what many consider to be the best way to learn another language. ONLY TURKISH SPOKEN HERE! No translation ever--just Turkish and images. I know that my mother learned far more Spanish in her one semester in high school using this method (a native speaker for a teacher who said at the beginning, "Hello. This is the first and last time you will EVER hear English spoken in this room.") than I learned in my one semester with an American teaching Spanish with mostly English spoken in class.

I especially appreciate the variety of the Turkish "teachers" in Rosetta Stone. Multiple male and female voices each speaking with completely natural, subtle differences. The companion audio CDs are also great when driving and nicely reinforce the lessons--especially when you remember to picture in your mind what you hear and repeat.

I'm rapidly learning to hear, pronounce and read words with the proper syllables as modified by suffixes and I'm finally understanding the vowel rhythm even if "ü" and "ö" still refuse to be produced properly in my mouth.

Most importantly, Turkish is popping into my mind without translation.

I am taking the lessons very slowly and continue to repeat them even though I consistently score well above 90% the first time. The program itself will repeat older lessons automatically, but I am doing my best to commit each lesson to instant recall before proceeding beyond the next one or two.


Yentakvetch
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Re: Rosetta Stone for Turkish

Post by Yentakvetch » Thu Jun 23, 2011 3:01 am

Because I can't discipline myself to dedicate part of each day to sitting in front of the computer and doing any language program, I am using Pimsleur. I have used it for a variety of languages and it is great if you are just trying to get by during a holiday stay. I have no doubt Rosetta Stone would be better if I really wanted to learn the language in depth.

Even knowing a few words--especially the numbers--helps. There was the time in Hungary where I actually understood a conversation in Hungarian about charging me about $5 more because I was a foreigner! I was so stunned I understood anything that I didn't do anything.

I am halfway through the Pimsleur 30 lessons of Turkish. I play them over and over in the car until each lesson locks in and I move to the next one.

Can't wait for my trip!

And thanks to Tom for setting up this site.

Lauren Kahn

Tosun Saral
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Re: Rosetta Stone for Turkish

Post by Tosun Saral » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:01 am

Çekoslovakyalılaştırdıklarımızdan mısınız? :lol:
Bir berber bir berbere gel birader bir berber dükkanı açalım demiş. :lol:
Don't die before visiting Turkey

SwampeastMike
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Re: Rosetta Stone for Turkish

Post by SwampeastMike » Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:20 am

Tosun Saral wrote:Çekoslovakyalılaştırdıklarımızdan mısınız? :lol:
Bir berber bir berbere gel birader bir berber dükkanı açalım demiş. :lol:
Yes, I'm beginning to learn the flow of Turkish grammar. (I *think* that's what you asked.)

I also understand the "Bir berber..." story after quoting it (thanks to you) to a few barbers. "How do you know that?" We laugh together but none ever tried to tell me the end of the story...

The two "brother" barbers could never agree to open one barber shop so they opened two!

Long live the Turkish barber! I do my utmost to keep them in business. The barber shops are the BEST place to learn, enjoy and laugh even if they somewhat torture hairy men.


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