The "Missing" Long "A" Sound

All about the Turkish language: learning aids, reviews and comments on courses, books, teachers--anything having to do with this wonderful language.

Moderator: sinan

Post Reply
SwampeastMike
Posts: 296
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:08 pm
How many stars? **: 0
Location: Swampeast Missouri, USA

The "Missing" Long "A" Sound

Post by SwampeastMike » Mon May 02, 2011 2:07 am

I'm not certain if my ears can be totally trusted when listening to my language learning course.

Am I correct that an "e" at the end of a word is very frequently spoken as a sort of short, long "a"?

Also does this syllable "ay" when it is in the middle of a word often sound exactly like an English long "a" without a hint of the "yuh" sound of a "y"?


heraclitus
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 6:40 am

Re: The "Missing" Long "A" Sound

Post by heraclitus » Tue May 03, 2011 5:40 am

From one autodidact to another (and with my Turkish fading fast. . .)

E at the end of a word, huh? Like in "nerede" (where) or in "sadece" (only)? I learned this as a kind of "ehhh" sound something like the "eh" sound in the English word "deaf" only a bit flatter and without any elongation of the vowel. Kind of an "eh" grunt, if you will. Does this make any sense????

As for the "ay" sound in the middle of a word. In words like the greeting günaydın (good morning) I hear this ay sound as EYE, as in guehn-EYE-duhn.

If you are still in doubt, check out the various online Turkish dictionaries that the Internet has to offer. A lot of these have imbedded sound files. Sometimes you need to hear three or four different spoken versions of a word to reach a useable understanding. If you have an Iphone/Pad/Touch I can recommend the Collins English/Turkish dictionary and also their phrasebook app. Every word has a sound file attached so you can keep hitting the button for a troublesome word and repeat it until you finally get it.

SwampeastMike
Posts: 296
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:08 pm
How many stars? **: 0
Location: Swampeast Missouri, USA

Re: The "Missing" Long "A" Sound

Post by SwampeastMike » Tue May 03, 2011 5:11 pm

"e" at the end of a word like in "bu ne". It sure seems that I hear "boo neigh". Yes, I usually hear "eh" at the end of "nerede"

"ay" in "günaydın" definitely sounds like "eye" to me as well. For the life of me I can't recall one of the words where "ay" seems to sound like a long "a" but will mention when I encounter. Perhaps it is another vowel followed by "y". To my ear at least, the letter "y" in Turkish often sounds like a vowel modifier that varies with the harmony of the word.

I suppose Turkish is like any language--native speakers have slightly different ways of pronouncing--too bad that I don't really sound like any of them... I can practice and practice and practice and when I talk with one of my Turkish friends they still say, "You sound funny."

One female voice in my Rosetta Stone course seems to make no distinction between the suffixes "-lar" and "-ler" except when pronouncing just that suffix. One male voice pronounces "tuvalet" just like the French "toilet" without a hint of a "v" sound.

I'm a bit proud of my accentless American English that repeatedly receives comments of, "You are very easy to understand" no matter where I travel in the world. Perhaps I'm shooting too high in my desire for similar in Turkish.

Tosun Saral
Posts: 235
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 7:36 pm
How many stars? **: 0
Location: Ankara/Turkey
Contact:

Re: The "Missing" Long "A" Sound

Post by Tosun Saral » Fri May 06, 2011 10:22 am

My wifes name is "Eser". My non-Turkish friends hardly pronounce her name. The word "eser" have to meanings.
1- It is an Arabic word which means "production, work of art, sign,trace"
2- Turkish. "blows" which comes from "esmek" to blow or to wind. :)
Don't die before visiting Turkey


Post Reply