Who set İzmir on fire?

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suppiluliuma
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Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by suppiluliuma » Thu Apr 08, 2010 10:04 pm

This is a letter from Turkish CNBC-e channel to the producers of American serial Pacific.
When you read the letter, you'll understand the case.
In Turkish we say "güler misin ağlar mısın" :) Shall I smile or weep?

To the attention of HBO Producers, During the third episode of the television show “The Pacific” which started airing on March 14th, 2010 in the USA, the dialogue between Marine soldier Leckie and the Greek woman is in contradiction with historical facts and aims to offend Turkey in the eyes of the international community. This scene suggests that Turks have invaded and ransacked Izmir.

First and foremost, we believe that this dialogue has been intentionally included in the script:

1. Even though a dialogue like this is not present in one of the original books the movie is based on, “Helmet For My Pillow” written by Robert Leckie, Marine Leckie sadly listens to this alleged “invasion” and agrees in the show.

2. Although the movie decribes WW2, Japan and the United States and the truth about the Pacific front in the 1940’s; the audience is strangely left to see the story of a sacked Anatolian city in the 20’s, which is total fiction.

Millions of people who don’t know that Izmir was in fact invaded by the Greeks and have no idea about the history behind our country’s struggle to become a free republic might think that Izmir was a Greek city and that it was invaded and sacked by the Turks. In fact, Izmir is a Turkish city where both Greeks and Turks live together and governed by Turkish states since the 14th century.

Izmir was invaded by the Greek army on May 15,1919; the city was besieged for 3 years, 3 months and 24 days by the Greeks and was saved by the national war waged by the Turkish people on September 9, 1922. In short, Izmir is not a Greek city that was sacked by the Turks, but rather a Turkish city that was sacked by the Greek government.

And when it comes to the great fire of Izmir, there are various theories. It is said that either the soldiers under Nurettin Pasha, fleeing Greeks or resisting Armenians might be responsible for the fire. In fact, there are some stories that suggest that the fire started in a cathedral where armory that belonged to resisting Armenians blew up. We would like to stress that it is not ethical to suggest statements in such a certain manner in a situation even when historians don’t agree upon them.

This scene, which has apparently nothing to do with the entire concept of the show, looks like a clear case of lobbying. Once again, we would like to point out that this situation is blackening the independance struggle of a nation and wish that HBO would not be a mediator for misleading and provocative maneuvers such as this one.
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KayaKoyuOldBoy
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by KayaKoyuOldBoy » Fri Apr 09, 2010 9:30 am

Smile, and move on. :D

Tosun Saral
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tosun Saral » Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:26 pm

Kayakoyuoldboy My Friend you can not just smile and move on if you are a Turk or a friend of Turkey and Turks. You must defend this beautiful country and its unfamed citizens by all forums.
If you are reading a book or watching a movie about misdeeds of Turks during WWI and during 1922 written by a greek or armenian or a missionary priest you must think 1001 times about the truthness of the story. Because they fabricate all kinds of lies and untrue stories. But indeed there are few honest men who writes the truth. We, Turks, must always be ready to rubbish their fabrications.
Here is the real story of civilized greeks on that day May 15th 1919 which we never forget. I am very happy that we revenged those innocent Turks killed, raped, tortured by civilized greeks. And of the christian citizens of Ottoman empire they paid their miscalculation by supporting the civilized greeks.
Thanks to the Army of Mustafa Kemal there are no more non-Turks in Anatolia. Anatolia has never been pure Turkish since 1071.
An honest man Jorge Blanco Villalta, the Spanish Ambassador to Ankara during the reign of Atatürk, wrote a book called "Atatürk". The book is translated into English by William Campbell, published by Türk Tarih Kurumu, Ankara in 1976. p.175, 176, 177

" The day dawned without any apparent sign of the tragedy which it was going to witness. The radiant spring sun was happily bathing the beautiful harbour of Smyrna. That 15th of May was for the Turks an unforgettable day: it was an indescribable ordeal, in which European nations such as France, Great Britain and Italy, who had gone to great lengths to try to show how much more civilised they were than Turkey, showed that their pretentions were baseless, by consenting to the outrage which befell Turkey under their very eyes. Their prestige collapsed and from then on the Turks were able to look upon these Powers without any false haloes, and see them as thay re-ally were.
At seven in the morning, the Greek warships "Averof" and "Limnos" followed by several transport ships anchored off Smyrna. They immediately began to land several infantry regiments. The troops lined up on the quay-sides; the Greek population was at first silent, but then began to acclaim Venizelos, Greece, and the soldiers who were disembarking. Enthusiasm mounted; the priests, who had been worked up into a high state of emotion, harangued the populace. Then, a huge Greek flag was hoisted at the head of an Evzone regiment, and the troops began to march forward. A thick crowd of foreigners, Greeks and other non-Moslems repeated the cry of the Evzones: "Zito Venizelos!" — Long live Venizelos!

The Turks stayed in their houses and their troops stayed in the barracks. it was to the barracks that the delirious crowd went. it was occupied, apart from its garrison, by officers of other regiments and services. They had collected there under urgent orders; the soldiers laid down their arms and waited for their unknown fate. The invaders arrived. Some shots were heard from the barracks; it has never been discovered who was to blame, but it is logical to suppose that some Greek agent was given the job of provoking thefth. in order to provide a pretext. it seems that this had been expected, since machine-guns were immediately heard in action, and rounds of rifle fire followed rapidly. The barracks guard fell without firing a single shot. There was great confusion inside. The men ran from one side to another looking for a refuge, and many were killed or wounded. The garrison was seized with panic. At last an officer came out to parley at the main gate, holding a white cloth, but this was not respected and he fell dead. The Greeks entered the building, collected ali its occupants and formed them into a long line to which was joined another formed by the Governor and ali the employees who had been found in his palace.
As the line of Turks moved silently and with lowered heads towards the harbour, they were insulted by the populace, who reached a paroxysm of excitement. The rough soldiers threatened the Turkish officers with their bayonets and struck them with their rifle butts; those who were wounded by this were helped along by their comrades, since to leave them on the way would have been to condemn them to a horrible death. Their enemies also amused themselves by making the prisoners shout "Zito Venizelos!" laughing at them, and if anyone was unfortunate enough to resist, pulling off his fez, which was the worst insult which could be done to a Moslem; many refused, and their blood immediately ran upon the pavement. Colonel Süleyman Fethi, head of the recruitment board of the Seventeenth Army Corps, who despised the threats and held his fez on with both hands, fell with his skull smashed by a rifle butt.
Suddenly, when they were already on the quayside, the long line of prisoners was attacked by machine-gun fire. Sixty men fell to the ground, and those who survived were roughly put on board the Greek transports. in the city there began looting of Turkish houses and institutions, and there were more insults in the streets. When Moslem women came, wild with grief, in search of news of their sons and husbands, the veils were torn from their faces and they received insults with words and deeds.
The fifteenth of May ended with a sad reckoning: three hundred Turks had been murdered and six hundred wounded. The events of that day's work shook the great mass of the Turkish people out of the torpor in which the war, the Armistice and the allied occupation had sunk them. Censorship was established, and the details of the first days of the Greek occupation did not
reach the European public. Only in istanbul itself were certain rumors to be heard. On the 17th, the echo of the atrocities which had occurred brought a powerful feeling, since the refugees from Smyrna had told of the horrors they had seen; indignation boiled amongst the Turks. it was clear, they thought, the Powers had decided that Turkey must die; the proof of it was that they had acted as a shield for the massacre in Smyrna. *
Massacres followed each other in the ruins of Anatolia, lit up by the ruddy light of fires, and to the accompaniment of the crics of pain of the victims as they fell before the thundering of the artillery on the battle fronts, and the clamour of protests against the West. The 15th May 1919 was the beginning of the interminable years of suffering which fate still held for Turkey."
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Tosun Saral
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tosun Saral » Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:35 pm

pages, 312,313,314

"On the 9th of September, the Turkish army made its entry into the Pearl of the Orient. The Greeks had offered a feeble resistance in the outskirts of the town, in order to give time to the embarkation of the main body of the fleeing troops, and the exhausted multitudes which followed them. Their pursuers caught up with them so successfully, that the last Greeks and the first Turks arrived together at the beginnings of the town. To the sea! The fugitives thought of nothing else; to get rid of their weapons and of every-thing which would prevent them getting to the place of embarkation before the next man. The vanguard of the concraering army made its entry amid the enthusiasm of the Moslem population. There occurred some bloody clashes, provoked by Greeks and Armenians, who fired upon the soldiers at various points of their march, but the conduct of the Turkish officers is vorthy of praise, since they managed to quell the rage which their men must have felt from the sight of Anatolia in flames, and prevent them from taking vengeance on the mass of Christians who were waiting in crowds upon the quayside, or sacking the Christian craarters.
Kemal entered the city 24 hours after the arrival of the army, without heeding objections made to him on the grounds that the city was stili dangerous for him. Passing along the quayside, which was the only part of the city where the houses did not reach the waters of the gulf, the commander saw the ships of the allied scpıadrons some distance from the shore, great monsters, powerless witnesses of the defeat of the West. The European Powers and the new Turkey were now face to face. He was going to make Europe understand that a new era had dawned, and that from then onwards they must refrain from getting involved in the life of Turkey.
With his generals, he took the following military measures: first, the remains of the invading army would be expelled, while the Turkish army would set out in two directions, towards the Bosporus and the Dardanelles. He had no worries in the diplomatic field; the Powers who were interested would come to him, the victor.
Unexpectedly there then began for the heroic general a period of sentimental activity. On the day after his arrival, a young Turkish lady who had insistently asked to see him came into his office at headquarters. She present-ed herself as Latife Hanım. She had recently returned from France where she was studying law, and her parents were stili there. She had suffered the Greek oppression in Smyrna, having been suspected of giving Information to the Turkish army. She now came to ask the Gazi to accept hospitality at her villa at Bornova, together with his general staff.
Kemal was observing her with pleasure, somewhat surprised by the sure way in which she spoke and the boldness of her manner. Her magnif-icent eyes, the perfect oval of her face, and determined chin, gave a real attraction to her features which were animated by a strong will and lively intelligence. Her dress showed that she was familiar with the latest ordi-nances of Parisian fashion; hcvvever, although like women of the upper classes she had given up the veil since the World "War, she had covered her head with a black scarf, which fell över her shoulders and contrasted \vith the pallor of her countenance.
With well-chosen -vvords she expressed the admiration inspired in her by the Gazi's achievements, and her thanks as a Turkish woman. She showed him a medallion in which he saw his own face. He was happy to accept the hospitality of such an agreeable person, and some days later was installed in the villa belonging to Latife's parents at Bornova, which is a short distance from the city and is a village favoured by the rich families because of the tranquil beauty of the place, overlooking the last curve of the gulf.
The mistress of the house surrounded her guest with the greatest com-fort, and he, exhausted as he was by the soldier's life he had led during the campaign, was properly grateful. He was flattered by Latife's attentions; but what attracted him to her was the breadth of her knowledge, and the accuracy of her judgement. He enjoyed discussing things with her, and she could follow him on any subject; he could not remember having met any young lady to equal her in education. Her manners vere such as one acquires in distinguished families. Thus the Gazi moved from his admiration of his hostess for her intellectual qualities, and without noticing, to seeing her also as a woman, an aspect which offered equal reason to attract him.
Thousands of Christians, Greeks and Armenians, were floving into the devastated areas vdthout interruption; they understood that the gulf which had opened between the Turks and themselves would prevent them from living together in the future. These masses of people jostled on the quayside, waiting
for the boats in which they could leave the rich and once happy Ionia. They were afflicted with a contagious panic, and nasty scenes occurred as those who had arrived last tried to push into the front ranks; their features accpıired a crazed expression from the notion that a general massacre might begin at any moment. The boats available for evacuation vrere ahvays too few for the human tide which was ahvays growing.
Fires broke out at various places in the city, especially in the Armenian quarter. The flames, helped by the wind, moved from one house to the next, and from one quarter to another; in a short time the larger and most important part of the city "was nothing more than a huge bonfire. Voices were raised in Europe accusing the Turks of responsibility for the disaster, and instancing the event as an incontestable proof of Turkish vandalism. This final slander falls before logical thought. "Who was it that devastated Anatolia? Who was it that declared that Smyrna would not be surrendered intact? The answer is too well-known to repeat.
This spectacle worthy of Nero lasted for three days. The Gazi watched the progress of the fire with his face tvvisted in silent grief. How much evil the Great Powers had caused in Turkey, Kemal thought, through their policy of sowing discord between the various peoples who formed her population, igniting in themthe spirit of Nationalism and Religion, and givingthem visions of unattainable autonomy! However, vdth the victory he had gained, and the firm attitude which he \vould follow, and which had been his invariable way of behaviour towards Imperialist Europe, he would show her the necessity of treating Turkey as a sovereign country, and that the days of intrigues were över. The old story of the Christian minorities threatened by the Turks, and the need to protect them, would end of its own accord, since the minorities had emigrated in the wake of the aTmies they had helped to enter the country: in the East the Russians, the French in the South, the Greeks in the West.
When the fire was göne, the ruins could be seen; there was a chaos of the skeletons of blackened \valls and smoking ashes, ali the more horrible and sad because that wide stain lay amid an idyllic scene, under the deep blue coastal sky."
Tosun Saral
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tosun Saral » Sat Apr 10, 2010 3:45 pm

We call non muslim population of Anatolia speaking a greek dialect and believing into greek othodoxy as RUM not Greek. Rum is an arabic word for Romans. We took Anatolia in 1071 from East Romans. For that reason we call these people Rum.

Izmir held "twice as many Rums as Athens" As Athens was an unimported town, Izmir was one of the main metropolis's trade centres of whole asia and Europa before 1922.
On the other hand Selanik hold twice as many Turks as Istanbul.
According to the census of 1897 the city of Selanik had 150 000 population. (90 000 Turks, 45 000 Jews, 15 000 Rum) There were 56 mosques, 12 churches, 21 sinanoges, 11 great Turkish baths the Hamam, 300 palaces, 3060 fountains, 4400 shops in the city.
The province of Selanik had 500 000 population. 3/4 was pure Turkish.

At the same time the city of Izmir had 154 000 population. ( 70 000 Turks, 53 000 Rum, 7000 Armenian, 15 000 Jews)
For that reason Turks called Izmir "Gavur Izmir " (Unbeliever Izmir)

source: My late brother Osman Yavuz Saral "Kaybettiğimiz Rumeli" (The Rumelia That We Lost) p.36,37

TS's nota: Rum of Izmir were living a luxus life. While the poor Turks fighting on 3 continents and 7 seas, the sons of Rum was educating in Paris, Berlin, London, trading and earning great money.
Sorry but they were fools. The Rum colloborated with the puppet king of Greece and paid their miscalculation with a great desaster. I feel Sorry and pitty for them and thank to the Army of Mustafa Kemal that there is no more Rum in Turkish mainland. But we have still a great Turkish moslem population in West Trace.
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by suppiluliuma » Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:14 pm

Dear Tosun Bey.
I didn't mean to start a long history lesson in this forum.
I though it might be an interesting topic and just shared here. apparently it's none of anybody else's interest.
I agree with Kayaköyüoldboy, I don't care that much.
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tosun Saral » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:07 pm

Sorry My Friend,
I care too much. Milletimi ve vatanımı lekeleyen hiç bir şeye bigane kalamam. I can not just stay there and laugh. I take every necesary steps to be againts all anti-turkish fabrications.
:(
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tavsan » Sat Apr 17, 2010 10:58 pm

These inaccuracies need to be addressed. Isn't The Pacific a collaboration between Speilberg and Tom Hanks. If two of the best movie people in the US have it wrong they need to be corrected because believe it or not people will watch movies and accept entertainment as historical fact.

While not everyone in America has it in for Turkey there are people who want only to make Turkey look bad. Given our track record in the US on just about everything, we have no right to criticize Turkey. No matter who set it on fire, Izmir rose from the ashes and is a beautiful city once again. Thank you for wanting to clarify the situation. HBO can take the criticism. I just hope they listen and act with better judgment in the future.

Tavsan
Last edited by Tavsan on Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:28 am, edited 1 time in total.

suppiluliuma
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by suppiluliuma » Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:20 am

Ignorance is hard to break, easy to conduct.
Especially when flavoured with prejudices, there's not much to overcome.
I don't expect that HBO would remove that part from the show and publish a refutation.
I'm not sure Spielberg and Hanks really care about the truth. If they do, they'd interfere in the beginning.
If someone doesn't care about my truth, I don't care about his. That was my point when saying "I don't care..."
Why should I bother to explain the history of Turkey to somebody in this millenium.
All the truth is just one "click" away from your finger, if you really are willing to learn.
If you are not, it won't work no matter how much I tell you.

By the way Tavşan, I really appreciate your view, thank you very much for sharing. I wish we had more of you there. :)
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Re: Who set İzmir on fire?

Post by Tavsan » Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:42 am

Suppiluliuma~

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I love Turkey its high points, flaws, and everything in between but if someone sets out to criticize the Republic they can at least get their facts straight and that is rarely the case particularly with the US, Britain, France, etc. as they seem to criticize others so easily and forget just how badly they have behaved in the past and in many instances in the present. Oh and let's not forget Germany and Russia. :D I was just in Izmir and had an incredible time. Had probably one of the best meals of my entire life there at Asansor. I could have stayed on the site of the Agora for days. Simply a stunning city and this comes from the guy who's in love with Ankara. I hope she doesn't get mad. :lol:

Tavsan


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